Tag Archives: conference

DevOpsDays Austin 2019 Retrospective

2019-05-02 12.49.54As mentioned, DevOpsDays Austin 2019 went off great!  And after the event, we sent out extensive surveys to attendees, sponsors, volunteers, speakers, and even the organizers to learn and improve. (Thanks to everyone who gave their feedback, we appreciate it!)

Last year we also did an extensive retrospective to figure out how we wanted this year to go, and this year’s event was driven by that feedback and our vision to make DoD Austin the place for practitioners to come, learn from each other, and build the local community.

Let me share this year’s retro with you – some of the numbers and sentiments are below with my thoughts. If you want the full details, sure, here you go!

Full DevOpsDays Austin 2019 Retrospective (pdf)

If you’re not familiar with a NPS score, it’s used to measure sentiment on a scale from -100 to +100.  When you get asked “would you recommend” something on a 1-10 scale, generally they’re taking that number and bucketing it into 1-6 being detractors (counted as negative), 7-8 being neutral, and 9-10 being promoters (counted as positive). Above 0 is “good”, above 50 is “excellent.”  See more about NPS scores here.

Sorry about the quality of the pics, these are basically ones I snapped myself on my iPhone. But hopefully they show some of what happened at the event!

Attendee Feedback (62 NPS, 50 responses)

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Damon Edwards

“Informative, laid back, friendly, humorous event. My favorite conference for a couple of years now.” 84% of attendees said they were likely to return.

The things people liked the most as measured by the freeform comments were the openspaces (9 comments), the speakers/talks, especially their diversity (8 votes), the culture/atmosphere of the event (5 votes), and the community and people (5 votes).

This makes me happy. DevOpsDays isn’t just “a conference,” it really focuses on building community – people meeting each other in a friendly and collaborative environment. The content is nice but it’s not the primary value of the event.

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Mandy Whaley

Concerns people had the most were “Nothing/great job” (10 votes), difficulty with travel and parking at the venue, including handicap access (6 votes), talks (6 votes), we want better lunches (4 votes).

Read on for more but we’re probably changing venues next year and will keep access in mind.  Now on the lunches – we used to have fancy lunches and they were a significant time and effort sink, with long lines, lots of time spent, and so on.  We moved to box lunches and now lunch goes fast and easy and leaves everyone more time to interact with each other.  We do not plan to ever change back from that, but we will see if we can get a BBQ place or something to do a nice lunch box.

(There were more likes and dislikes and we are evaluating action on all of them, but dang this post is going to be long already so I’m focusing on the top line items.)

Speaker Feedback (90 NPS, 10 responses)

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Pete Cheslock

  • “Everyone was really positive; welcoming, low-pressure environment.”
  • Experience – 50% excellent, 50% very good
  • Organization – 40% extremely, 50% very organized
  • Friendliness – 90% extremely, 10% very friendly

Likes: No tech problems/helpful techs/setup organized (x4), Supportive/welcoming (x3), Engaged audience (x3).  Dislikes: Chromebook support problem, schedule slippage, openspaces competing with Conversations talks.

Great overall, some things for us to tweak!  After several years in the same venue and buying a lot of gear, our crack AV team have the tech end of it pretty much down pat.

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Jon Loyens

Organizer Feedback (88 NPS, 8 responses)

  • “Just [wanted] to say how much I enjoy working with the crew and watching it all come together to put on a great event for the community. I get a lot out of doing it each year and see my contribution as an important way to give back.”
  • Time spent – 62.5% just right, 12.5% little long, 12.5% little short, 12.5% way too short
  • 93% likely to return (the one that isn’t pleaded a heavy year at work coming up)

Major likes included working together (x3), inclusion (x2), and the opportunity to give back (x2). Dislikes included some stressing out and looking for problems, and speaker notification happening late. There was good discussion about explaining openspaces more especially for the newer folks.

It’s important to me that our organizers have a good time too – my assigned domain on the organizer team is “Organizers” – besides working the master budget and schedule for folks, I facilitate and try to ensure that this volunteer gig is not onerous, and I’m happy we seem to be there.

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Deborah Hawkins

Volunteer Feedback (94 NPS, 17 responses)

  • Experience: 72.7% excellent, 27.78% very good
  • How much time you spend – 83% about right, 11% too much, 6% too little
  • 93% likely to return

We have a lot of volunteers from the community that come to slave away working the event for a free ticket and a couple meals, basically.  It’s very important to all of us that they have a good experience – these are the future organizers, and community members going above and beyond to give back to the community.  Boyd and Daria and the other organizers did a great job both organizing the work and making sure the volunteers had time to participate in the event and have a good experience – even given the storm-nightmare loadout at the end of the event. Thanks to all our great volunteers!

Sponsor Feedback (60 NPS, 10 responses)

  • “A++ highly recommend, etc. Y’all did a bang-up job putting this together, and the community is certainly a testament to your hard work and continuous efforts. I’ve told everyone at HQ that we need to learn from you.”
  • Experience – 70% excellent, 20% very good, 10% good
  • Liked: “Always a great event – excellent sessions, great opportunities to meet with customers and prospects.” Vendor area good. Friendly people and networking.
  • Disliked: Platinum sponsors were upstairs. Water bottles ran out. We want badge scanners. No day before setup. Only 1 minute blurb. Schedule off track. When will courtesy shipping be picked up.

2019-05-03 09.49.41So… Sponsors. For a number of years we kept expanding our sponsor offerings.  Then we realized the event had become too much of a traditional conference and we were spending lots of space, time, and effort on sponsors, when to be honest we don’t really need all that much money to put on the event.  Two years ago after a bunch of sponsor problems and everyone working themselves to the bone to provide professional conference services I did away with sponsor tables altogether. We let them back this year but really wanted to make the event not about that.  We also warn the sponsors up front this isn’t a “churn the leads” event, we want sponsors who are going to send technical people to engage with the community.

Did it work out that way?  Kinda. There’s too much expectation set up about what “conferences are like” and “DevOpsDays are like” and between the person purchasing the sponsorship and the people actually sent on site there’s a lot of room for expectations to drift.

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Tristan Slominski

I feel like there’s plenty of big conferences for that kind of sponsor engagement.  DevOpsDayses didn’t used to be like that, but as time goes on and they all grow it’s tempting to “improve” by making it more sponsor focused. We love sponsors who engage with the community but we consciously balance their participation in the event.

Funny story… Like I said we only let sponsor tables back on a limited basis this year. But there was a run on them, and we sold out of the ones we needed to fund the event quickly and had a bunch of sponsors still wanting to participate, including ones who had participated for  years. So we extended the sponsor room, just to let them participate, because we felt bad about excluding them. So we always sell out, so that’s probably a sign that we’re doing fine there.

And we got to sponsor a house for the homeless with the spare money, so that’s spiffy.

Recruiter Feedback (-50 NPS, 2 responses)

This is a new addition that didn’t work out so well. We had imagined a big recruiter speed dating thing. But few recruiters and attendees signed up for it so we pivoted into a recruiter fair.  It was during happy hour, but half the attendees leave before that. We had them by the bar, but the DevOps Trivia during the happy hour was also a big draw.

While all the recruiters rated their experience “good” they had low traffic.

So, sorry that didn’t work out. But I stressed to the organizers that this wasn’t a failure – if we don’t try new things that don’t work out sometimes, we’re not trying hard enough.

We’re one of the great grand-daddy DevOps events. We have years of experience, ample funding, and a big community.  Smaller DoDs, especially ones getting off the ground, often need to hew close to the “standard format” for a safe launch and to pay their bills.  We can afford to experiment, so I strongly urge the team every year to try different things.  It’s OK if we appeal to different sets of the community each year.  It’s OK to not do something again (even if it went well) and it’s OK to try new things as stretch goals. I kinda like putting how we run our event where our DevOps mouth is, so to speak.

This lets us try things out first. We were the first DoD with a multi-content track. We created the new “Conversations” talk format this year. We keep innovating, and sometimes there’s just not a fit given the constraints of venue, time, people, and so on. So this one didn’t go off great, but to me that just means we’re legitimately experimenting hard enough.

Ernest’s Retrospective Thoughts

Overall it went great!  Smooth, excellent execution by everyone involved. I feel like the Austin tech community is stronger for our event existing and that’s what I want out of it.

My main challenge personally this year was with the talks.

We really went into this year with an intent to curate the talks to a pretty specific practitioner format. DoD Austin has a bunch of years behind it so we don’t necessarily need the DevOps “talk circuit” talks to fill slots.  We feel like we can be very specific about the experience we want to curate – no repeat talks from other events (go watch them on the Internet, everyone posts videos!), some preference to local speakers, encourage diversity both in speakers and in content…  But we didn’t execute on that well.  We started using Papercall this year and it makes it easy for people to mass submit to multiple events – a great feature but somewhat antithetical to our needs. We had 200 submissions for 20 slots and had a lot of weeding to do and had to turn away a lot of folks. And while we had good talks, they didn’t fit our proposed theme necessarily.

We also just selected talks late, to where it risked people whose talks were declined not being able to attend because we sold out our attendee cap.

The second challenge was with openspaces.  In general the larger the event, the harder it is to make openspaces work. Once there’s more than 25 people in an openspace the format collapses and it’s just “2-3 people talking to each other and everyone else straining to hear,” basically a super crap panel talk. Putting them in the luxury boxes in the stadium worked really well there, because only so many people can fit into one, so it was a forcing function to keep them small enough to work. So they went well overall.

But some folks didn’t like them. Each year we get some feedback from folks more used to traditional content.  “Maybe we should get the openspace topics submitted before the conference so they’re already on the schedule!” No offense, but over my dead body. That’s not what openspaces are about and openspaces are the heart of DevOpsDays. They are for what the actual attendees want to talk about right then; the entire point is that they’re not programmed content. Early DevOpsDays were a couple talks and then pretty much all openspaces.  My general attitude is “if you don’t want to participate in openspaces, this is not the event for you.” We need to explain openspaces more ahead of time though, to seed ideas and get new people to understand the format.  Our experiment with mini-talks and then linked openspaces worked out great, I went to two of them and got high value out of them.

Next Year

A couple big changes are coming next year.

First of all, we’re probably changing venue.  We’ve enjoyed the stadium a lot, and love the staff there, but we’ve probably done as much as we can with the event in that particular form factor.

We’re considering going entirely to the new 20 minute talk format.  They were well received – if you really have more content than 20 minutes, a linked openspace is probably the best venue to explore it with highly engaged attendees!  And it’ll prevent people just submitting their “same talk” as much. We can also get more speakers in!

Also, we know it’s a bummer that we’ve been capping attendance and sponsors and that people who want to attend get turned away. So far we’ve felt like we have had to, both because of venue capacity but also to keep openspaces good and keep the great atmosphere and community and opportunities for engagement that make our event distinct.

Now that we have enough experience, we think we might be able to go bigger and still keep the small group and one-on-one interaction. We’ve all been to a bunch of conferences and seen other things – 1-1 mentoring table signups, for example, and other formats that facilitate it.  We’re also thinking about adding some “working groups” – opportunities to do something, produce position papers, whatnot, give the experts a really neat thing to do at the event.

And maybe even add on a third day, with all unstructured content. On a Saturday so people could bring their kids and stuff.

I wanted to just blaze big next year; the rest of the team loved the vision but reminded me how much burn-in there is on a new venue – getting A/V figured out, all the rough spots of a year one… So we may iterate into it, with getting a new venue and going slightly larger and trying out new engagement ideas next year, and then the year after saying “Big tent!  All are welcome!  Fly in for this one, no attendee or sponsor caps!” and making it a heroically sized event.

There’s no one right format for DevOpsDays – I encourage other organizers to keep experimenting as well.  Your event doesn’t have to be the same year to year; you can target different goals and audiences and sizes and such each time.

If anyone read this far, feel free and comment with your thoughts below! (Obligatory disclaimer, don’t tell me “well this isn’t right for my DevOpsDays” – that’s fine, none of this is to declare the “right” way to do an event, it’s just what is working for us in our community with our particular goals.)

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DevOpsDays Austin 2019 Highlights

devops_mascot_texas_color_swapWe held our eighth DevOpsDays Austin last month! DevOpsDays Austin 2019 was held at the UT Austin stadium for two days full of talks, openspaces, and so on. All the videos of the sessions are up on YouTube in the DevOps Austin channel that holds other years’ videos as well.

Here’s my top 10 countdown list of great things about this year’s DevOpsDays Austin!

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Platinum Sponsor Suite

10. We brought the sponsor room back, and added platinum suites in the stadium luxury boxes so sponsors that wanted to hold sessions could do so. There were very well attended sessions in these suites!

9. We had two content tracks and a new “Conversations” talk format – a short 20 minute talk followed by a linked openspace for interactive demos and discussions and command line stuff that doesn’t do well in a talk session. We only had space for a handful of them but they were very highly rated and we’re considering shifting significantly towards them next year.

8. We made the happy hour more modest and onsite, but with DevOps Trivia from Patrick Debois!  We had a bunch of teams compete and it was a wild and woolly time. We even used Patrick’s zender.tv online trivia thing to let people outside the venue compete.

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The remnants of the cupcakes

7. Our fine venue, food, and drink team and vendors… We ripped into some mini cupcakes at snack time!!!

6. The openspaces.  I actually got to attend some this year instead of just running around working.  And they were all brilliant.

5. Our organizers! We bestowed the title of MVP organizer on two organizers this year – Daria Ilic for her great job with communication and Dan Zentgraf for doing a yeoman job with the sponsors.

Special thanks to all the DevOpsDays Austin 2019 organizers: James Wickett (Speakers), Peco Karayanev (Speakers), Karthik Gaekwad (Swag), Daria Ilic (Marketing, Volunteers), Dan Zentgraf (Sponsors), Tom Hall (Sponsors), Boyd Hemphill (Volunteers), Scott Baldwin (Web site), Lee Thompson (AV), Carl Perry (AV), Ian Richardson (Attendees), Chris Casey (Signage and Slides), Richard Boyd (Venue, Food, Happy Hour), Asif Ahmad (Venue, Food, Happy Hour), Bailey Moore (Venue, Food, Happy Hour), and thanks to Laura from ConferenceOps for doing all our finances.

4. I let the other organizers talk me into buying the Jumbotron!  I am naturally thrifty so had resisted given the significant price tag in previous years, but we had a glut of sponsors and everyone really wanted it so I finally gave in. Karthik even changed his Slack name to JUMBOTRON to petition for it. It remains so until this very day. You  have to respect the dedication. So behold – the DevOpsDays Austin Jumbotron! (Yes, that’s real, not Photoshopped.)

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3. Check out our cool organizer swag I got each organizer this year as a thank you gift – custom Vans with the DevOpsDays Austin mascot on them!  (They’re only $80, if a little work intensive to design on their site, feel free and steal the idea!) People always love our DevOpsDays Austin shirts so I wanted to give the organizers a really distinctive way to show their pride in the event.

vans

2019-05-02 09.48.152. A very special thank you to DevOpsDays Austin from Mandy Whaley and the Cisco DevNet crew, who have been sponsors and speakers and attendees for many years.  I wasn’t expecting this – they actually used their sponsor shout-out time to present us onstage with a heartfelt card that they read to the audience.

We appreciate everything that Mandy and the team bring to the event and the card was super touching.2019-05-02-09.49.56.jpg

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1. What could be better than that, though, you ask? How can such a kind shout-out be number 2 on the list?

Well, we had a little problem, and that problem was a spare $25,000 from letting in the gold sponsors above our initial sponsor room cap because they really, really wanted in and we felt bad for them. DevOpsDays Austin (like all DoDs) is a non-profit, so while we keep a war chest to pay for next year’s venue and stuff, the rest has to go. Previous years we did some modest donations to the Capitol Area Food Bank; last year we actually had enough spare money so that we let each organizer do a $1000 donation to a charity of their choice. But this was quite a larger chunk, so what to do?

Some of the organizers brought up a great opportunity they knew about and had given to themselves. Here in Austin there’s a really unique program going on, the Community First! Village – a planned community that provides affordable, permanent housing and a supportive community for men and women coming out of chronic homelessness.

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Community First! Village Micro-Home

And it turns out $25,000 is how much is needed to build a micro-home in their next phase of expansion, to house a formerly homeless person in their community. These are little 180-200 square foot homes with electricity but no plumbing that are the foundation of their village. The whole organizer team got super excited about this opportunity.

So that’s what we did – we sponsored one of these homes to be built. We’re pleased to have the ability to help Austin in a permanent way out of the conference!

I’m going to do a separate blog post on this because it’s an awesome program that many companies in Austin have been getting behind, and it’s remarkably successful in helping our large homeless population. But thanks so much to all the sponsors and attendees that made this possible.

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DoD Austin Organizer (and Family) Tour of the Community First! Village

We had a great time at DevOpsDays Austin this year and hope many of you did too. Next, we’ll publish a full retrospective that we hope some of you and other DevOpsDays organizers will find interesting.

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Keep Austin Agile 2018 Trip Report

This Thursday, both myself and my boss (the SVP of Engineering at Alienvault) went to Keep Austin Agile, the annual conference that Agile Austin, the local Austin agile user group network, puts on!  I used to run the Agile Austin DevOps SIG till I just ran out of time to do all the community stuff I was doing and had to cut it out.

Logo-Tagline.2376.v2017.08.16

It’s super professional for a practitioner conference, and was at the JW Marriott in downtown Austin one day only.  It was sold out at 750 people. I figured I’d share my notes in case anyone’s interested.  All the presentations are online here and video is coming soon.

DevOps Archaeology

My first session was DevOps Archaeology by Lee Fox (@foxinatx), the cloud architect for Infor. The premise is that it’s an unfortunately common task in the industry to have to “go find out how that old thing works,” whether it’s code or systems or, of course, the hybrid of the two.  So he has tips and tools to help with that process.  Super practical.  Several of my engineers at work are working on projects that are exactly this. “Hey that critical old system someone pooped out 3 years ago and then moved on – go figure it out and operationalize it.”

I basically wrote down the list of cool tools that help with this process…
  • Codecity – visualizes your code as a city
  • Gource  – visualizes the evolution of your codebase over time
  • Signaturesurvey – scan for patterns in code
  • Logstalgia – visualizes historical traffic to a Web endpoint
  • Proxies – setting up proxies helps understand what’s going on, at an even deeper level than flow logs.
  • Monitoring – you know, all the usual monitoring tools.
  • Logs – you know, all the usual log aggregation tools.
Then he had a bunch of AWS-specific tools too.  All our stuff is in AWS, so super useful.
  • Cloudtrail – AWS API logs, yeah.  We pump our cloudtrail into our own USM Anywhere instance to report on weirdness.
  • Config – new service, have it report on things not tagged right, if volumes are encrypted, whatever kind of rules you want to set up.  Nice!
  • Trusted Advisor – well, don’t trust it too much, I’ve learned the hard way there’s lots of limits and stuff it doesn’t know about.  But useful.
  • Macie – “machine learning” (I always put that in scare quotes nowadays because of its overuse) to identify weirdness in your environment. Detect high risk cloudtrail events, unusual locations of activity, and so on.

And, some discussion of testing, config management, and so on.  Great talk, I will look into some of these tools!

Brewing Great Agile Team Dynamics

This talk, by Allison Pollard (@allison_pollard) and Barry Forrest (@bforrest30), wasn’t really my cup of tea. It did a basic 4-quadrant personality survey to break us up into 4 categories of Compliance, Dominance, Steadiness, or Influencer.  Then we spent most of the time wandering the room in a giant circle doing activities that each took 10 minutes longer than they needed to.

So I’m fine with the 4 quadrant thing – but I got taught a similar thing back when starting my first job at FedEx back in 1993, so it wasn’t exactly late breaking news.  (Driver, Analytical, Amiable, and Expressive were the four, IIRC.)  As a new person it was illuminating and made me realize you have to think about different personalities’ approaches and not consider other approaches automatically “bad.” So yay for the concept.

But I’m not big on the time consuming agile game thing that is at lots of these conferences. “What might turn you off about a Dominant person?  That they can be rude?” Ok, good mini-wisdom, should it take 10 minutes to get it? Maybe it’s just because I’m a Driver, but I get extremely restless in formats like this. A lot of people must like them because agile conferences have them a lot, but they’re not for me.

Modern Lean Leadership

Next up was Modern Lean Leadership by Mark Spitzer (@mspitzer), an agile coach. I love me some Deming and also am always looking to improve my leadership, so this drew me in this time slot.

First, he quoted Deming’s 14 points for total quality management.  For the record (quoted from asq.org:

  1. Create constancy of purpose for improving products and services.
  2. Adopt the new philosophy.
  3. Cease dependence on inspection to achieve quality.
  4. End the practice of awarding business on price alone; instead, minimize total cost by working with a single supplier.
  5. Improve constantly and forever every process for planning, production and service.
  6. Institute training on the job.
  7. Adopt and institute leadership.
  8. Drive out fear.
  9. Break down barriers between staff areas.
  10. Eliminate slogans, exhortations and targets for the workforce.
  11. Eliminate numerical quotas for the workforce and numerical goals for management.
  12. Remove barriers that rob people of pride of workmanship, and eliminate the annual rating or merit system.
  13. Institute a vigorous program of education and self-improvement for everyone.
  14. Put everybody in the company to work accomplishing the transformation.

His talk focused on #7 and #8 – instituting leadership and driving out fear.

Many organizations are fear driven. Even if it’s more subtle than the fear of being fired, the fear of being proven wrong, losing face, etc. is a very real inhibitor.  Moving the organization from fear to safety to awesome is the desired trajectory.

He uses “Modern Agile” (Modernagile.org) which I hadn’t heard of before, but its principles are aligned with this:

  • Make People Awesome
  • Make Safety a Prerequisite
  • Experiment & Learn Rapidly
  • Deliver Value Continuously

So how do we create safety? There’s a lot to that, but he presented a quality tool to analyze fear and its sources – who cares and why – to help.

Then the next step is to determine mitigations, and how to measure their success and timebox them. I’m a big fan of timeboxing, it is critical to making deeper improvement without being stuck down the rabbit hole.  I tell my engineers all the time when asked “well but how much do I go improve this code/process” to pick a reasonable time box and then do what you can in that window.

OK, but once you have safety, how do you make people awesome? Well, what is awesome about a job?  Focus on those things.  You can use the usual Lean techniques, like stop-work authority, making progress visible (e.g. days without an incident), using the Toyota kata for continuous improvement, using Plan-Do-Check-Act…

In terms of tangible places to start, he focused on things that disrupt people’s sleep at night, doing retros for fear/safety, and establishing metric indicators as targets for improvement.

Another good talk!

How The Marine Corps Creates High-Performing Teams

Andy McKnight gave this interesting talk – explaining how the Marines build a culture and teamwork, so that we might adapt their approach to our organizations.  I do like yelling at people, so I am all in!

Marine boot camp is partially about technical excellence, but also about steeping recruits in their organizational culture. (In business, new hire orientations have been shown to give strong benefits… And mentoring after the fact.)

What is culture?  It is the shared values, beliefs, assumptions that govern how people behave.

Most organizations have microcultures at the team level.  But how do you make a macroculture?  Culture comes first, teambuilding second.

  1. shift your org structure to align with the value stream instead of functional silos
  2. measure as a team

The 11 Marine Corps Leadership Principles:

  1. Know yourself and seek self-improvement.
  2. Be technically and tactically proficient.
  3. Develop a sense of responsibility among your subordinates.
  4. Make sound and timely decisions.
  5. Set an example.
  6. Know your people and look out for their welfare.
  7. Keep your people informed.
  8. Seek responsibility and take responsibility for your actions.
  9. Ensure assigned tasks are understood, supervised, and accomplished.
  10. Train your people as a team.
  11. Employ your team in accordance with its capabilities.

On the scrum team – those necessary to get the work done

The two Leadership Objectives – mission accomplishment and team welfare, a balance.

Discussion of Commanders Intent and delegating decisions down to the lowest effective level.

Good discussion, loads of takeaways. At my work I would say we are working on developing a macroculture but don’t currently have one, so I’ll be interested to put some of this into practice.

Agile for Distributed Teams

And finally, Agile for Distributed Teams by Paul Brownell (@paulbaustin). At my work we have distributed teams and it’s a challenge. Lots of stuff in the slides, my takeaways are:

  • People’s biggest concern – not understanding enough context, not sharing values
  • Use multiple communication channels – video, chat, email.
  • Get F2F time.  Quarterly.  Make it happen. Use ambassadors.
  • Expose the team to Other parts of the org, get users involved
  • Establish rules of engagement – hours, channels, etc. for clarity.
  • Teams will have local subcultures – make a space for shared learning, encourage lateral communication, emphasize early progress.
  • Use icebreakers in standups etc – something about your week
  • Teambuilding- slack channels, scavenger hunts
  • Sprint planning – one or two meetings? Involve the team.
  • Standups – try all on headsets to level the playing field for in room/out of room.
  • Online whiteboards
  • Retros – be creative, get written feedback ahead of time

All right!  4 of 5 sessions made me happy, which is a good ratio. Check out these talks and more on the Keep Austin Agile 2018 Web site!  It’s a large and well run conference; consider attending it even if you’re not an “agile coach”!

 

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Ensuring Performance In Complex Architectures

The Agile Admin’s very own Peco Karayanev (@bproverb) gave this talk at Velocity this year.  Learn you some monitoring theory!

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Three Upcoming DevOps Events You Should Attend

I wanted to mention a couple Austin area events folks should be aware of – and one international one!  November is full of DevOps goodness, so come to some or all of these…

The international one is called All Day DevOps, Tuesday November 15 2016, and is a one long day, AMER and EMEA hours, 3-track, free online conference.  It has all the heavy hitter presenters you’d expect from going to Velocity or a DevOpsDays or whatnot, but streaming free to all.  Sign up and figure out what you want to watch in what slot now!   James, Karthik, and I are curating and hosting the Infrastructure track so, you know, err on that side 🙂  There’s nearly 5000 people signed up already, so it should be lively!

Then there’s CD Summit Austin 2016.  There’s a regional IT conference called Innotech, and devops.com came up with the great idea of running a DevOps event alongside it. It’s Wednesday November 16 (workshops) and Thursday November 17 (conference) in the Austin Convention Center. All four of the Agile Admins will be doing a panel on “The Evolution of Agility” at 11:20 on Thursday so come on out!  It’s cheap, even both days together are like $179.

But before all that – the best little application security convention in Texas (or frankly anywhere for my money) – LASCON is next week!   Tues and Wed Nov 1-2 are workshop days and then Thu-Fri Nov 3-4 are the conference days. I’m doing my Lean Security talk I did at RSA last fall on Friday, and James is speaking on Serverless on Thursday. $299 for the two conference days.

Loads of great stuff for all this month!

 

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Lean Security

James and I have been talking lately about the conjunction of Lean and Security.  The InfoSec world is changing rapidly, and just as DevOps has incorporated Lean techniques into the systems world, we feel that security has a lot to gain from doing the same.

We did a 20 minute talk on the subject at RSA, you can check out the slides and/or watch the video:

While we were there we were interviewed by Derek Weeks.  Read his blog post with a transcript of the interview, and/or watch the interview video!

Back here in Austin, I did an hour-long extended version of the talk for the local OWASP chapter.  Here’s a blog writeup from Kate Brew, and the slides and video:

We’ll be writing more about it here, but we wanted to get a content dump out to those who want it!

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Filed under DevOps, Security

DevOps Enterprise Summit Videos Are Up

There’s a crop of great talks from this event, check them out here. If you look really hard you can see my talk too!

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Filed under Conferences, DevOps