LASCON 2013 Report – First Morning

IMG_1475Arriving at #LASCON 2013, hosted as usual at the Norris Conference Center, the first thing you see is the vintage video games throughout the lobby! As usual it’s well run and you get your metal badge and other doodads without any folderol; volunteers packed the venue ready to help folks with anything. I got a lovely media badge since I’m on the hook to blog/tweet it up while I’m there! It’s in a nice central location on Anderson Lane so getting there took a lot less time than my normal commute to work did.

IMG_1481The MCs, James Wickett and David Hughes, got us kicked off. Thanks went out to many the LASCON sponsors!

  • White Hat
  • Qualys
  • Gemalto
  • Trustwave/Spider Labs
  • Critical Start
  • Sourcefire
  • SOS Security

IMG_1482Then everyone stood and raised their right hand to say the “LASCON pledge,” which consists of “I will not hack the Wi-fi,” “I will not social engineer other attendees and the nice Norris Conference Center staff who are hosting us,” and similar.

Then, the keynote!

Keynote- Nick Galbreath, The Origins of Insecurity

IMG_1488Nick Galbreath (@ngalbreath), VP of Engineering at Iponweb. He used to work for Etsy, now he works in Tokyo for a Russia-based ad infrastructure company.  Suck that, Edward Snowden.

Slides at speakerdeck.com/ngalbreath!

If you’re in security, you should be bringing someone else from dev or ops or something here! We can’t get much done by ourselves.

Crypto

There’s a lot of consternation about crypto and SSL and PKI lately. The math is sound!  See FP’s “The NSA’s New Code Breakers” – it’s way easier to get access other ways. I don’t know of any examples of brute forcing SSL keys – it’s attacking data at rest or bypassing it altogether.

But what about the android/bitcoin break and alleged fix re: Java SecureRandom PRNG? I can’t find the fix checked in anywhere.  Let’s look at SHA1PRNG. Where’s the spec? You’re forced to use it, where’s the open implementation, tests…

Basically everything went wrong in specification, implementation, testing, review, postmortem… Then the NIST’s Dual-EC-DRBG spec – slow and with a potential backdoor – but at least it’s not required by FIPS!  It’s broken but not mandatory and we know it’s broken, so fair enough. It’s a “standard turd.” Standards aren’t a replacement for common sense. Known turdy in 2007.  Why are you just removing it now? TLS 1.2 was approved in 2008, why don’t all browsers support it and no browsers support GCM mode? Old standards need augmentation and updates.

Fixing the CA system – four great ways, certificate pinning, pruning, HTTPS Strict-Transport-Security, certificate-transparency.org.

Everything Else

  • Network Security – stuff you didn’t write
  • App Security – stuff you did write
  • Endpoint Security – stuff you run

IT internal tech is mostly Windows/Mac CM and patching, 99% C-based stuff.

Tech Ops – Routers, Linux, Core server (all C too)

Dev:

  • Input validation – not hard
  • Configuration problems
  • Logical problems – more interesting
  • Language platform problems (most patches here also in C!)

Reactive work is patching, CM, fixing apps, patching infrastructure. You can focus your patching though – Win7 at current patches, Flash, Adobe, Java will get 99% of your problems, focus there – but it’s hard to do. But either you can do it trivially or it’s really hard.

Learn from the hardest apps to deploy.  The Chrome model of self updating gets 97% of people within a version in 4-6 weeks. Android, not so good- driven more by throwing out phones than any ability to upgrade. They’re chipping stuff away from the OS and making more into apps to speed it up. Apple/iOS just figured out app auto-update. Desktop lags though. WordPress is starting background updates. BSD is automatically installing security updates at first boot.

Releasing faster and safely is a competitive advantage AND makes you more secure.

For desktop upgrades, can’t we do something with containers? Why only one version installed? How can we find out about problems from users faster? How do we make patching and deployment easy for the dumbest users?

Even info on “How do I configure Apache securely” is wide and random on the Web. Silently breaks all the time, and it’s simple compared to firewalls, ssh, VPN, DNS… Rat’s nests full of crap, while it gets easier and easier to put servers on the internet. How can we make it safe to configure a server and keep it secure?

Can we do this for application development? Ruby BrakeMan is great, it does static analysis on commit and sends you email about rookie mistakes. Why not for apache config? (Where did chkconfig go?)

PHP Crypt – great for legacy passwords and horrible for new ones. Approximately 0% chance of a dev getting its configuration right.

See @manicode’s best practices – have a business level API for that.

By default, every language has a non-crypto, insecure PRNG. So people use them. They are used for some science stuff, but seriously if you’re doing physics you’re going to link something else in. Being slightly slower for toy apps that don’t care about security isn’t a big deal. Make the default PRNG secure! And, there’s 100x more people interested in making things fast than making them secure, so make the default language PRNG secure and people will make it faster.

libinjection.client9.com to try to eliminate SQL injection! It’s C, fast, low false positives, plug in anywhere.

Products focus on blocking and offense/intrusion, but leave these areas (actual fixing) uncovered.  Think globally, act locally. Even if you’re not a dev, most open source doesn’t have a security anything – join in!
Write fuzzers, compile with different flags, etc.

So think big, get involved, bring your friends!

Malware Automation

IMG_1490By Christopher Elisan from RSA, aka @tophs.

Total discovered malware is growing geometrically year over year. There are a lot of “DIY malware creation kits” nowadays; SpyEye, Zeus… These are more oriented around online crime; the kits of yesteryear were more about pissing contests about “mine is better than yours” (VCL, PS-MPC). The variation they can create is larger as well.

Armoring tools exist now – PFE CX for example, claims to encrypt, compress, etc. your executable – but all the functions don’t always work and buyers don’t check.  Indetecitbles.net is online and will do it! It was free but now it’s “hidden.”

Use a tool like ExeBundle to bundle up your malware and then share it out via whatever route (file sharing, google play, whatever). Or hacking and overwriting good wares – even those that bother publishing a hash to verify their software often keep it on the same Web site that is already getting hacked to change the executable, so the hash just gets changed too.

So you make your malware with a kit, put it through a crypter a realtime packer, an EXE binder, other armoring tools, then run through QA in terms of on premise and cloud AV, then you’re ready to go.

Targeted vs opportunistic attacks… Delivery is a lot easier when you can target.

Anyway, many of those new malware samples are really just the same core malware run through a different variety of armoring tools. They’re counted as different malware but should get grouped into families; he’s working on that at RSA now.

Besides the variation in malware, domains serving malware can rotate in minutes. Since the malware can be created so quickly it effectively defeats AV by generating too many unique signatures. Reversing has to be done but it takes weeks/months.

Demo: Creating Malware in 2 Minutes!

ZeuS Builder – bang, bot.exe, one every couple seconds. Unique but not hash-unique at this point. They look different on disk and in memory. Then runs Saw Crypter, in seconds it creates multiple samples from one ZeuS sample. Bang, automated generation of billlllllyuns of armored samples.

There’s really just a handful of kits behind all the malware, need new solutions that go after the tools and do signature-less detection.

From Gates to Guardians: Alternate Approaches to Product Security

IMG_1493Jason Chan, Director of Engineering from Netflix, in charge of security for the streaming product. Here are his slides on Slideshare!

Agile, cloud, continuous delivery, DevOps – traditional security doesn’t adapt well to these. We want to move fast and stay safe at Netflix.

The challenges are speed (rapid change) and scale. To address these…

  • Culture – If your culture has moved towards rapid delivery, it’s innovation first. Don’t be “Doctor No” and go against your company culture, you won’t be successful.  Adapt.
  • Visibility – you need to be able to see whats going on in a big distributed system.
  • Automation – no checklists and spreadsheets

At Netflix we do ~200+ pushes to production a day, 40M subscribers, 1000+ devices supported.

Culture

We have a lot of stuff on our site about this, it’s a big differentiator.  “Freedom and responsibility” is the summary. No buck passing. Responsible disclosure program externally.

We’re moving towards “full stack engineers” that know some about appsec, online operations, monitoring and response, infrastructure/systems/cloud – that can write some kind of code. The security industry seems to be moving towards superspecialists, we don’t see that as successful.

2 week sprint model, JIRA Scrum workflow (CLDSEC project!). No standups, weekly midsprint meeting. Bullpen shared-space model.

Visibility

Use their internal security dashboard (VPC, crypto, other services plug in and display their security metrics). Alerts send emails with descriptive subjects, the alert config, instructions/links as to where to check/what to do. Chat integration.

NSA asks, how do you verify software integrity in production?  How do you know you’re not backdoored?

They have their Mimir dashboard that is a CI/CD dashboard, that tracks source code to build to deploy to JIRA ticket. Traceability!

Canary testing because code reviews don’t catch much.  Deploy a new version and test it (regression, perf, security) and see if it’s OK. Automatic Canary Analyzer gets a confidence level – “99% GO!”

Simian Army does ongoing testing. Go to prod… Then the monkeys test it.

Security Monkey shows config change timestamps of security groups and stuff.

So they have Babou (the ocelot from Archer) that does file integrity monitoring. They use the immutable server pattern so checking is kinda easy, but you still can be running multiple canary versions at the same time so there’s not one “golden master.” This allows multiple baselines.

Q: How long did it take to make this change and implement? What were the triggers?
A: This push started when he started in 2011; previously IT security handled product security. He hired his first person last year and now they’re up to 10.

Q: What do you do earlier on in the lifecycle in arch and design (threat modeling etc.)?
A: Can’t be automated, the model here is optionally come engage us (with more aggressiveness for stuff that’s clearly sensitive/SOXey).

Q: So this finds problems but how do people know what to do in the first place, share mistakes cross teams?
A: As things happen, added libraries with training and documentation. But think of it as “libraries.”

Q: Competing with Amazon while renting their hardware? (Laaaaaame, the CEO has talked about this in multiple venues.)
A: AWS is the only real choice. Our CEOs talked.

Next – Lunch!  No liveblog of lunch, you foodie voyeurs!

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